St. Veronica Medical School Matriculates 15th Batch

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-GB
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Cultural Essayist, George Ngwane making an address on the occasion

Cultural Essayist, George Ngwane making an address on the occasion

By Anthony Njie

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-GB
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Four hundred and thirty-one students have been formally admitted to study at the St Veronica Higher Institute of Midwifery and Nursing, Buea, Southwest Region, for the 2013 academic year.

The freshmen took the matriculation oath Friday, November 7, 2013, before school authorities, some dignitaries and other returning students.

Cultural essayist and guest speaker at the event, George Ngwane, exhorted the students to blend civic responsibility and health care service delivery in a bid to practise their profession with zeal.

While admitting the various reasons which could have prompted them to opt for the profession, he, however, cautioned that by the time they will be leaving the institution, the end goal should first be to save lives.

The medical profession has been plagued by the accumulation of wealth, cumbersome bureaucratic procedures and very little value for human life, Ngwane bemoaned, stressing that the freshmen should break away from the routine of the system.

“People will give you awards, but God rewards. Make of interpersonal communication or psycho-therapy the foundation of your vocation and you will certainly excel,” he said.

On her part, the Administrator of St. Veronica Medical School, Mrs. Francisca Biaka, expressed gratitude to the Southwest Regional Delegation of Public Health for providing financial support, academic awards and student internship opportunities to the school over the years.

This booster, combined with the efforts of the staff and the commitment of students, she noted, will provide effective training for medical students and improve service quality in the health domain.

Students’ worries for employment opportunities were also echoed in the event through their representative, Theresa Achuo, who invited the school’s partners to canvass for avenues in the job market.

St Veronica Medical School went operational in 1998 with an enrollment figure of about 18 students; 15 years after it is still contributing to training health experts in society.

 

Bishop Rogan College Hosts Maiden Reforestation Project

By Anthony Njie

Students of Bishop Rogan College, Buea in the Southwest Region have been host to a maiden pilot project on tree planting geared towards building responsible behaviour on nature preservation.

“The exercise carried out on the school campus is only preparing a better tomorrow for us and our offspring,” said Barrister Innocent Bonu representing Liberty Eco an NGO with a bent on human rights, economic and environmental protection.

The event, which took place at the Bishop Rogan school premises, September 20, saw more than a dozen potted species of timber trees planted in the school

Bishop Bushu showing the good example by planting the first tree

Bishop Bushu showing the good example by planting the first tree

farm-yard.

Upon maturity, the selected species would be used to produce furniture, medicine and fire wood, and their leaves would serve as organic manure for future generation.

He noted that nature is in all its wonders, a gift from God for mankind to use, but the latter has abused it through the rampant felling of trees.

The legal expert said multinationals that cut down trees and plants under the guise of providing indigenes with bio-fuel are not different from human rights abusers.

Liberty Eco consultant and the brainchild of the project, Denis Kumbo, observed that human activities have altered nature’s seasonal cycle in recent years, making urgent Earth’s rescue mission.

For example, recent environmental reports on global warming in Mexico, said Kumbo, have caused unprecedented levels of flood and drought, the near extinction of biodiversity and igniting climate change which all play out to the progressive demise of humanity.

Kumbo exhorted the students and the teachers on urgent measures to tackle these environmental crises.

“Plant a tree now, for it has the potential of reversing these side effects,” he said.

Meanwhile, Bishop Rogan’s Environmental Club Prefect, Pascal Nywayi, promised to put his knowledge and skill in agriculture at the disposal of his school mates to leave a landmark not only in school but also wherever they find themselves.

To him, the only way for mankind to seek remission for the cruel deeds committed against mother Earth is to adopt an eco-friendly attitude and save the planet from imminent ruin.

The current Secretary General of Bishop Rogan Ex-students, William Lyonga, who doubles as the President of Environmental Club, said the project bodes well as teachers are eager to participate in the school farm, which will instil in students a plant-conservation mindset, and in due time, increase revenue for the school.

 

 

 

 

 

UB: Incoming VC pledges commitment in her new post.

The newly appointed vice chancellor of the University of Buea, Prof Nalova Lyonga says she would do every thing within her reach to take the institution to unprecedented heights.

Prof Nalova made this declaration shortly after her appointment last Friday, June 29th 2012, following the presidential degree. She expressed sincere gratitude to state authorities for giving her the opportunity to manage this institution. Prof Nalova further promised to work relentlessly with her team to put the University of Buea on the lamplight.

While acknowledging the challenges ahead of her, she enjoined the administration, the staff workers, the students and the community of Buea at large to work in collaboration and unity in a bid to foster harmony and development.

UB students awaiting the new VC, Prof Nalova Lyonga

The Director of English Programmes at the Faculty of Art, Dr. Fontem Niba lauded the appointment saying that he believes “the incoming vice chancellor would be ale to clear out some issues which have been potential source of conflict in the election of academic officials.”Dr Fontem explained that though meetings have been held at various levels of the educational ladder in view of the implementation of the electoral process in academy, he is confident that Prof Nalova should set the pace for this practice and end the growing discord that has been prevailing in the academic body.  Commenting on her personality, he said “we understand her to be a good listener, a pragmatic person and a realist, with those three qualities, unless subverted by her new position, there is a good reason to be optimistic”

Meanwhile the administration, lecturers’ body, students and even the support staff hold this promotion in great esteem, looking forward to a new dawn in the daily running of activities in the institution as she officially assume office work on Wednesday 4th July 2012.

ASJUB Open Day: JMC majors ready to take on the job market.

JMC majors in the University of Buea have been enjoined to harness and maintain a sense of professionalism in their job practice in a bid to stand out by the time they leave for

JMC majors performing

the market world.

The admonishment was made last Friday, June 15th 2012 on the occasion of the Association of Student Journalists of the University of Buea, ASJUB.

Speaking at the premises of the Open Commons of the University of Buea, The Deputy General Manager of Spectrum Communications Group of Companies, Bernard Fomunke said the media landscape in Cameroon is witnessing a great revolution with more and more TV stations and radio stations being created every day. Bernard added that this has tilted the stakes involved such that it no longer suffice to do creative and media planning without market research for instance. So for these reasons recruitment nowadays is done based on the value of the employee to deliver the skills required.He pointed out that in addition to building convincing CV job seekers must master the tips that lead to a successful interview once they are going for a tete-a-tete with the employer.

Editor in Chief of the English Desk for Equinoxe TV, Tamfu Harrison on his part talked about the various challenges journalists face while doing the profession in Cameroon. Harrison admitted that meager salaries must often compel reporters to seek for payola and freebies from their news sources. At times employers who are less knowledgeable on the ethics of the profession also dictate the editorial policy to follow in the station. He also counted technological difficulties and corruption as ills that are detrimental to the profession, emphasizing that ” those who will build a clean reputation in this field would enjoy the work of their endurance and patience.”

Other speakers included the CEO of ERUDEF, Micelise Kemyi who talked on social media and environmental reporting and Head of AFRICAPHONY, Mwalimu Georges Ngwane who on his part schooled the students on social media and cultural reporting.

GCE exams ends hitchfree

The last phase of exams for the General Certificate of Education(GCE) ended last June 12th, 2011 in all writing centres around Cameroon.
In Buea,the Delegate for Secondary Education in the South West region, Francis Ngondo Mokoba expressed satisfation looking at the turnout of candiadtes and staff authoririties in various centres. The Delegate said all the schools he had visited in the 6 departments of the region did pull on well.At this point, he is assured it is a good omen that the activity would ride on hitch-free even to till the marking process.
The Principal of Bilingual Grammar School(BGS), Buea, Ewusi Nathaniel said the exams had been without any major difficulty. He  said there were a few students with individual problems on their slips who were however allowed to sit in for the exams before any post-investigation could be done on their documents.”Others, he said “came with the intention to register for some subjects, but we refered them to the GCE Board.” The principal explained that schools writing in BGS ensured that the slips of their candidates had been sent before hand.
The Principal ofThe Government Technical School,GTHS, Molyko, David Molua equally ascertained that exams in his centre went on smoothly with an expected record of 941 candidates who answered present in their various halls. Though they began a bit late with the Bacc General on the first day, appropriate measures had been taken to resolve problems related to the organisation of the available personel the following days.
After the last subjects of the day, students express mixed feelings in relation to the nature of the exams in general and their performance in particular. An Ordinary Level caandidate, Tamukon Mirabel says she is looking forward to an A in Geology Paper 1, despite some considerable errors on the examination paper. Che Franklin on his part says he is hoping for the best but expecting the worse all the same for Economics Paper 2.An Advance Level candidate, Gibin Lisette confesses she did not encounter any difficulty in economics. She is confident that the rest of the exams was within her reach.

Government cuts down press subvention

The Government of Cameroon has cut down the financial package destined for private media organs in the country from FCFA 150 million to FCFA 135 million.The Minister of Communication, Issa Tchiroma Bakary,made the announcement in Yaounde, June 7 during a meeting with publishers and proprietors of private media firms.

The slash goes against the promises Tchiroma made last year that, he was working hard to step up the aid package to at least FCFA 200 million this year. It also contradicts the earlier claims of some members of Government who have been arguing against any increment, insisting that the FCFA 150 million was instituted by law.

The Minister said the purpose of the meeting was to disclose the sum at his disposal meant for the private press and to discuss, with promoters in the sector, on the procedure to share the money. He said the ministry was considering keeping part of the money for the training of some journalists who are still deficient in skills and also to purchase equipment for distribution to media organs.

According to the Minister, the gesture was an attempt to throw out accusations that part of the money was being embezzled by officials in his ministry. Commission members for the attribution of the aid have been accused of working in complicity with non-existent media organs to fraudulently syphon the aid.

The publishers and proprietors, on their part, told the Minister that the money should be distributed to them as usual and each organ would invest where it needs are most pressing. They held that the training of journalists is supposed to appear under entirely a different budgetary head in the Ministry of Communication. Others noted that it would cost the Government nothing to organise refresher courses for media practitioners across the country.

Accusing the Ministry for failing to state clearly the criteria used in distributing the money, some of the publishers and proprietors saw subjectivity in the conditions to be fulfilled by the media organs. Many complained that, contrary to initial declarations by the Minister that all media organs with up-to-date fiscal papers, are legible for the aid; they are still being sidelined, irrespective of the fact that press organs spend as much as FCFA 500 000 each, to fulfil the conditions.

Many speakers observed government’s hatred for the local press. Some disclosed that in neighbouring Cote D’Ivoire, the aid package to media organs, which are far less in number than than that of Cameroon , is FCFA 800 billion, while a similar amount is also given to the private press in countries like Senegal and Mali.

The giving out of adverts to foreign media organs to the tune of hundreds of millions by Government, to the detriment of the local media, was also condemned. It was alleged that the recent broadcast by Africa24 from Yaounde for a week, at the invitation of Government, took away FCFA 800 million of the tax payers’ money.

They observed that 2011, being an election year, the press was expecting more from government.Most press men interpreted this action as the political machinery to manipulate the press during this election year. Stating that he has listened attentively to the grievances of promoters of private media enterprises, Tchiroma said their efforts cannot be undermined, considering that their activities leads to job creation in the country.
Government’s failure to assist the press, he explained, is as a result of inadequate resources. Promising that a special account for subventions to private media would soon be a reality, Tchiroma argued that,the Government’s choice to place an advert in foreign media is a way to lure investors.